Review: Where the Truth Lies by Karina Kilmore

where-the-truth-lies-9781925685862_lgAn investigative journalist haunted by her past scrutinises the exorbitant number of  injuries and deaths of Grange Industry personnel at the Port of Melbourne in Karina Kilmore’s debut crime novel. But despite some compelling subject matter — big business clashing with the unions, the changing face of journalism, the government’s infringement on the public’s right to know — Where The Truth Lies is a low octane mystery laced with interesting elements that never quite mesh into an intoxicating page-turner, and frequently upends its own dramatic potential.

Take its main character, Chrissie O’Brian, a pill-popping, alcoholic journalist with The Argus, who is desperate to prove herself in the patriarchal newsroom, and desperate to escape her tragic past, for which she has assumed all blame. It would make sense (to me, at least; but who am I?) to prolong the the revelation of why she left New Zealand for Melbourne; build tension, make the reader question the veracity of O’Brian; yes, we want her to uncover the truth behind the deaths at Port of Melbourne, but what is she guilty of? Instead the events from her past are described in a simple flashback, stifling its gravitas.

Kilmore provides column-inches of background expertise on the harsh reality of the newspaper business and the Australian media landscape — she has 25 years of experience under her belt, so she has walked the walk — and the novel ticks along nicely during these moments; in fact, I’d love to sit in these scenes for longer, have the focus on breaking a story, pushing it through internal bureaucracy and dealing with government heavy-handedness. But these insights can’t buoy a plot that never really shifts out of neutral. My hope is that with the introduction of her lead out of the way, Kilmore’s sophomore novel leans into the aspects that sparkled here.

ISBN: 9781925685862
Pub: Simon & Schuster Australia
Pages: 352

Review: Such A Fun Age by Kiley Reid

9781526612151Announcing the arrival of an exceptional new voice, Such A Fun Age is a wry, sharp novel that brilliantly intertwines ruminations on race, romance, motherhood and class, in a novel that’s equal parts heart-wrenching and heart-warming, and never anything less than mesmeric. With her unflinching portrayal of life as a young black woman in America today, Kiley Reid has crafted an important book that sparks empathy and outrage, illuminating both its characters and larger social issues.

Definitely one to watch for in 2020.

ISBN: 9781526612151
Format: Paperback
Number Of Pages: 240
Available: 7th January 2020
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

 

Review: The Institute by Stephen King

9781529355406Lately Stephen King has seemed determined to thrill rather than chill, forsaking the spine-tingling spookiness of his seminal (and my favourite) books — hello, Pet Sematary; hi, It; good to see ya, Cujo! — in favour of telling exhilarating, completely absorbing, rollicking reads, replete with the kind of dazzling pyrotechnics and fantastic characters only he could conjure. The Institute is exactly that: a masterclass of entertainment, in which paranormally blessed kids are conscripted into a secret government lab in Maine (naturally) and forced to endure horrific tortures.

The book opens with Jack Reacher-like wanderer Tim Jamieson ex-(decorated) cop taking a job in the small South Carolina town of DuPray. King lays all his cards on the table: this guy is going to be a hero. We’re rooting for this guy. The question King dangles is, what force is he up against? We don’t get an immediate answer. Instead, smash-cut to Minneapolis, where the super-intelligent Luke Ellis is kidnapped from his own home while his parents are murdered, and transported to the facility known as ‘the Institute,’ run by the evil Mrs Sigsby. After the first hundred pages, readers know Luke and Ellis’s paths will cross: but when, and how? And what will the ramifications be?

Cancel all your plans and settle in for the ride. This is escapism at its purest and finest.

ISBN: 9781529355406
Format: Paperback / softback
Pages: 496
Imprint: Hodder & Stoughton
Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton
Publish Date: 10-Sep-2019
Country of Publication: United Kingdom

Review: A Dangerous Man by Robert Crais

a-dangerous-man-9781471157615_lgRobert Crais is one of the most dependable names in thriller-lit, and Joe Pike and Elvis Cole are two of its most indelible protagonists. A Dangerous Man is the eighteenth in the series — but newcomers won’t feel left behind — and its setup is deliciously unpretentious: Pike is parked outside a bank when Isabel Roland, a young teller, is plucked off the street by two men in an SUV. Pike — ex-marine, turned-vigilante — intervenes (obviously), less by choice, more by instinct, and rescues the young woman, only for her to be kidnapped again days later. Looping in his partner, Cole, the duo amass a sizeable body count as they search for Isabel and uncover the reason why she’s a target.

A Dangerous Man is taut, slick and action-packed; a Jack Reacher style page-turner, but with the fat trimmed.  There are few thrillers writers that cut to the chase quite as quickly as Crais and able to maintain the same velocity for three hundred pages. I enjoyed it, immensely; until I got to the end and started thinking about it, specifically in relation to the Bechdel test and realised every woman in the book is a victim, and their page-time is dedicated almost entirely to being chased, kidnapped, or discussing the attractiveness of Pike. It’s anachronistic, unnecessary, and a blemish on an otherwise consummate thriller. Recommended, but with reservations.

ISBN: 9781471157622
Format: Paperback / softback
Pages: 352
Imprint: Simon & Schuster Ltd
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Ltd
Publish Date: 18-Jul-2019
Country of Publication: United Kingdom

Review: Beware of the Dog by Peter Corris

9781760110154Middling among the distinguished author’s score of mysteries, but even the most routine Peter Corris novel offers incidental pleasures, and as a historical document of early-nineties Sydney, it’s well worth tracking down a copy of.

This tale of an affluent family’s murderous dysfunction sees Cliff Hardy’s gun stole and wanted by police in relation to a shooting. Corris wires together every cliche of the private eye genre electrifyingly; he treads familiar ground, but with such relish, it’s impossible not to be swept away.

Solid, unspectacular, but utterly engrossing.

ISBN: 9781760110154
Format: Paperback
Number Of Pages: 200
Publisher: Allen & Unwin
Country of Publication: AU

Review: Lost You by Haylen Beck

9781911215608Once again writing under the pseudonym Haylen Beck, Stuart Neville has produced a top-notch, twist-filled psychological thriller about a woman who’ll do anything for her child.

Lost You opens in a holiday resort in Naples, on Florida’s Gulf Coast. In an anxiety-inducing scene, three-year-old Ethan squirms in a woman’s arms as she climbs to the hotel’s roof. Police and hotel security surround the area; she can hear cries of alarm from guests below. One foot in front of the other she continues to move across the rooftop, towards its edge, Ethan still struggling, their fates seemingly entwined. Which they are, and have been for a long time, as readers learn when the narrative spirals backwards, revealing Ethan’s true parentage, and the desperate, ruthless actions a mother is capable of when her child is at risk.

With shades of Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl and Michael Robotham’s The Secrets She Keeps, the less you know about Lost You the better. It delivers twist after twist, and although connoisseurs of the genre might pick some, I’m positive even the most prolific psychological thriller reader won’t anticipate every swerve in this tale. Beck’s latest is a chilling, gripping thriller you’ll put your life on hold for to finish. A consummate tale of suspense.

ISBN: 9781911215608
Format: Paperback / softback
Pages: 320
Imprint: Harvill Secker
Publisher: Vintage Publishing
Publish Date: 27-Jun-2019
Country of Publication: United Kingdom

Review: The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead

9780708899434“The boys could have been many things had they not been ruined by that place.”

Based on the true life atrocities of the state-run Dozier School for Boys, Colson Whitehead’s The Nickel Boys tells the harrowing tale of Elwood Curtis, a law-abiding, hardworking, studious teenager, emboldened by Martin Luther King and the civil rights movement, who is sentenced to the Nickel Academy in the 1960s following a tragically innocent misadventure. What he experiences there — the sadistic punishments, the abuse wreaked by the faculty upon its students — belies belief, seems inhuman. But it happened. This is fiction based on fact.

From its brutal opening, depicting a secret grave site being discovered in the present day on the grounds of the juvenile reform school, The Nickel Boys is an unsparing, necessary portrait of America’s history of racism and violence and its eternal legacy. Horrifically, the Dozier School for Boys was only closed down in 2011; so this is not a book the sins of the past, it’s about realising the violations recounted within are the sins of the present.

It’s an extraordinary book, with an ending that lands like gut punch. You simply must read it.

ISBN: 9780708899434
Format: Paperback / softback
Pages: 224
Imprint: Fleet
Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group
Publish Date: 16-Jul-2019
Country of Publication: United Kingdom