Review: Out of the Dark by Gregg Hurwitz

9780718185480The badass amalgamation of Bond, Bourne, Reacher and Batman is back in a fourth instalment in the Orphan X saga — and this time it’s personal!

Evan Smoak is Orphan X, aka ‘The Nowhere Man;’ a one-time government assassin (as part of the covert ‘Orphan’ program) turned into a pro bono harbinger of justice, whose Bat Signal is a cell phone number. Over the course of this scenery-smashing series, a mysterious foe has been targeting Orphans for assassination. When we last caught up with Evan (2018’s Hellbent) he identified the orchestrator of the killings: none other than the President of the United States, the morally bankrupt Jonathan Bennett. Now, in Out of the Dark, it’s Evan out for blood; in Washington DC to exact revenge on the most powerful and well-protected man on the planet. Piece of cake, right?

Naturally, Evan is side-tracked by a ‘Nowhere Man’ case, but this time it feels like more of a subplot than imperative to the narrative; like Hurwitz was conscious he needed to give readers a break from Evan’s hunt for the President, just to remind readers he’s not exclusively a rogue government assassin, and that he abides by a moral code. When Trevon Gaines discovers his immediate family have been slaughtered by drug-smuggling he inadvertently crossed, he calls Evan’s encrypted line, and thus Orphan X finds himself aiding an intellectually challenged, but incredibly sweet and well-intentioned young man, which leads to a brilliant climactic battle that had me genuinely dumbfounded as to how Hurwitz would write Evan out of a particularly harrowing quandary.

Gregg Hurwitz has crammed an insane amount of action into his Orphan X quartet, but he doesn’t relish in the bloodbaths his characters unleash with stunning regularity. Bodies are bruised and bloodied amidst the chaos, and there’s always a moment of reflection when — win, lose or draw — its perpetrators realise their lives will never be anything but violent; it’s cyclical and senseless, and by mastering its craft they’ve fallen into an inescapable chasm that renders any chance of a normal life impossible. Even when Evan wins, he loses.

Fast, furious, frenetic; Out of the Dark  ends Evan Smoke’s inaugural story-arc, tying off several loose threads from previous novels. Wherever the character goes from here, I’ll be there with him. Nobody writes a better high-stakes action thriller than Hurwitz.

ISBN: 9780718185497
Format: Paperback / softback
Pages: 448
Imprint: Michael Joseph Ltd
Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd
Publish Date: 5-Feb-2019
Country of Publication: United Kingdom

Review: The Nowhere Man by Gregg Hurwitz

nowhere-manEvan Smoak, the titular character of Orphan X and its sequel, The Nowhere Man, is a highly-trained professional assassin, plucked from an orphanage as a boy and trained to Jason Bourne levels of badassery. But Smoak turned against his programming — naturally — and escaped their clutches, choosing instead to utilise his skills to help those in dire straits as The Nowhere Man. He lives in an apartment complex, in a unit that resembles the Batcave, and waits for his phone to ring – his equivalent to the Bat-Signal. He has no personal life, no real friends or family: he lives for the mission.

It’s a great setup for a series, which is slightly undermined in this sequel, purely because it strips away much of what made the first novel so great. Sure, the action is non-stop and intensely visceral, and the stakes are ratcheted up to the extreme; but the supporting cast — Evan’s neighbours — barely feature, and the book clings onto his convoluted backstory. I had hoped, with the origin story out of the way, Gregg Hurwitz might provide some first-rate standalone thrillers before returning to Smoak’s past, but that’s not the case. In fact, I’m wondering now if the Orphan X / Nowhere Man series is actually a trilogy, because it feels like, come this novel’s end, we’re gearing up towards a grand confrontation in the next book. That’s not necessarily a bad thing — it just feels like there’s more to explore with this character and his world.

The Nowhere Man sees Evan ambushed, drugged kidnapped, and held captive at an unknown, isolated location. His captors want money — Evan has access to almost limitless clandestine accounts — and they don’t seem to realise just how valuable he is. Removed from his equipment, Smoak pits his skills against a determined, psychotic crew, while dangerous figures from his past close in.

There’s not much new here, but The Nowhere Man is a fine thriller, punctuated with plenty of action that’ll keep thriller buffs entertained for its entirety. Only Lee Child’s Jack Reacher kicks as much ass as efficiently as Evan Smoak.

ISBN: 9781405910743
Format: Paperback (234mm x 153mm x mm)
Pages: 400
Imprint: Penguin Books Ltd
Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd
Publish Date: 26-Jan-2017
Country of Publication: United Kingdom