Review: Kingdom Come by Mark Waid & Alex Ross

81tnmidlshlIt has been many, many years since I last read Mark Waid and Alex Ross’ Kingdom Come, but after watching the enjoyable (but heavily flawed) Justice League, I was in the mood to indulge my love of all things DC Comics. Kingdom Come was the closest collected edition at hand, but to be frank, I was a little wary about returning to it after more than a decade. I last read it in High School, and have held it to such a high standard since that inaugural reading, I feared the scrutiny of my “adult eye.”

This “Elseworlds” tale —  a story that takes place outside the DC Universe canon — occurs in a future where a vigilante segment of the super hero population, emboldened by public sentiment, have broken the established “code” set by the traditional heroes, and have started killing villains rather than incarcerating them. Disturbed by this brave new world, Superman has “retired” and his Justice League peers have gone into various states of hibernation or eccentricity. Superman has isolated himself and no longer dons his heroic garb, essentially retired. Batman, addled by an accumulation of injuries during his decades of crime-fighting, now patrols Gotham City with a fleet of cyborgs.

After the extermination of super-villainy, these new breed of heroes are left with no one to combat but themselves; it’s a wild west with super powers rather than six-shooters. When a catastrophic incident wipes out Kansas, it forces Superman and his fellow Justice Leaguers to return order to a world in disarray; to remind them of the importance of a moral code, of fighting for truth and justice… and to foil the evil machinations of Lex Luthor and co.

The story is narrated by an elderly pastor named Norman McCay, who is approached by The Spectre to be the supreme being’s guide through these upcoming potentially apocalyptic events. As a kid, I disliked these scenes because I thought they detracted from the action, but presently, I really appreciated this human perspective. It is unfathomable to imagine living in a world populated by God-like beings with the power to obliterate us with the blink of an eye; imagine being  a person of faith. And while I have always been a great fan of Alex Ross’s art — his painterly style is often mimicked but never matched — I’ve never liked his sequential work, and find his panels rather static. Of course, whether Kingdom Come would’ve had such resonance without his illustrations is unanswerable, and his work certainly isn’t flawed; it just lacks velocity.

Kingdom Come is one of those collections non-comic-reading people can enjoy. Unrestrained by continuity, it is that rare thing in comics: a story that has a beginning and an end. A decade after I last read it, I’m thrilled it still holds up, and serves as a demonstration that tales involving costumed heroes don’t just have to involve punch-outs and explosions. The best stories have heart.

ISBN: 9780606340083
Format: Hardback (257mm x 170mm x 15mm)
Imprint: Turtleback Books
Publisher: Turtleback Books
Publish Date: 30-Sep-2008

Review: Slugfest – Inside the Epic, 50-Year Battle Between Marvel and DC by Reed Tucker

SlugfestAlthough I am longer a Wednesday Warrior, and visits to my local comic book shop have dwindled to maybe once a month, I remain deeply interested in the industry. Working in a bookshop means focusing on prose rather than comics, and the reality is, nobody ever asks my opinion on the latest issue of Spider-Man, but they do value my thoughts on the latest Bosch novel by Michael Connelly. But comics — specifically DC Comics and Superman — initiated my love of reading as a child.

I lost myself in the convoluted world of Superman in the mid-nineties, when he returned from the dead with a mullet after his devastating battle with Doomsday, broke off his engagement with Lois Lane, then married her, then developed new electric powers… Much of it was nonsensical, all of it was ridiculous, but I loved those comics. My father and grandmother would buy me a comic book from the newsagents every weekend, and every school holidays dad would take me to the comic book shop, where I had a $50 spending limit, and got to indulge my habit. I started reading Batman and Justice League, then discovered Marvel’s stuff, and became a regular reader of Spider-Man. The storytelling was soap-operatic and addictive, and from those superhero comics I moved onto Marvel and DC books starring their flagship characters, which in turn propelled me into reading non-superhero related fiction. It’s a safe bet to say I would not be writing this blog, or be working as a bookseller, if it wasn’t for comic books. And the current state of the industry, in terms of the periodicals themselves rather than the cash-cow films, concerns me greatly. There are so many brilliant writers currently crafting brilliant comics, specifically on the creator-owned scene, and it’s terrifying thinking about the limited readership on offer despite the incredible storytelling on offer.

Reed Tucker’s Slugfest – Inside the Epic, 50-Year Battle Between Marvel and DC is a succinct blow-by-blow account of the often-bitter rivalry between the comic book industry’s biggest players. It’s riveting, for those interested in the subject matter, but reads more like a primer than a comprehensive delineation of DC and Marvel’s evolution from ‘funny books’ to intellectual property for multinational entertainment behemoths. Much like Sean Howe’s Marvel Comics: The Untold Story, my favourite sections of Tucker’s book are whenever personnel from the two companies offer their perspective on specific events that transpired; the raw animosity between editorial departments and personnel, their attempts at one-upmanship, and the few times the companies partnered for crossovers. Tucker’s book is impeccably researched and authoritative, but I wanted more.

The book is evenhanded and certainly readable, and for those with even the smallest interest in the industry it’s a great place to start. Those who want more depth and analysis should check out books published by Sequart, who specialise in going deep on everything comics-related.

ISBN: 9780751568974
Format: Paperback (234mm x 153mm x mm)
Pages: 304
Imprint: Sphere
Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group
Publish Date: 5-Oct-2017
Country of Publication: United Kingdom

Review: Batman Vol. 1 – I Am Gotham (DC Rebirth) by Tom King & David Finch

batmanThe whole purpose of DC’s ongoing ‘Rebirth’ initiative is to relaunch the publisher’s well-loved core characters in their most iconic forms. In other words, make them accessible to new readers, but throw in some bones for the long-time fans, too. Tom King and David Finch’s first volume of their Batman run achieves this. It’s a fun, action-packed story-arc, which introduces two new superheroes into the lore, and leaves plenty of page space for Finch to showcase his artistic skill. It’s a fun romp; but it’s not much more than that. Which is enough, for some; but for readers such as myself, who dip in and out of mainstream comics, there’s not quite enough here to warrant a return for the second volume.

When a couple of masked metahumans with the powers of Superman arrive in Gotham City, Batman thinks they have the potential to be the kind of heroes he won’t ever be: he is only human, after all. With their super powers and impervious dedication to the protection of the city from its own sordid underbelly, Gotham and Gotham Girl are precisely the kind of guardians who can protect Gotham for decades to come. That is, until their perceptions are twisted by one of Batman’s villains, and suddenly Gotham’s most powerful heroes become a force for evil, and the Dark Knight becomes their target for termination.

Tom King is currently penning one of my favourite comic series, The Sheriff of Babylon, but his Batman run lacks the punch of that creator-owned series. It’s not that his writing here is of an inferior quality; just that, by necessity, and the fact this is a mainstream superhero comic book, it has been stripped of much of its nuance. His pairing with David Finch seems wasted, too; while the artist excels at the big moments, and the action-packed pages are wonderful to behold, the quieter moments lack any sort of pop and emotional gravitas.

I Am Gotham is a solid superhero yarn, which sets the board for King and Finch’s run on the title. I’ve read better superhero comics, and I’ve read worse. It is stuck in that annoying middle ground, where there’s not much to say about it, one way or the other. It’s a book I read, enjoyed, and won’t remember.

ISBN: 9781401267773
Format: Paperback  (252mm x 168mm x 15mm)
Imprint: DC Comics
Publisher: DC Comics
Publish Date: 24-Jan-2017
Country of Publication: United States

Review: Secret Hero Society – Study Hall of Justice by Derek Fridolfs and Dustin Nguyen

9781760276539.jpgThe cynic in me wanted to view Derek Fridolfs’ and Dustin Nguyen’s Secret Hero Society: Study Hall of Justice as a perfunctory vehicle to spotlight younger versions of DC comics heroes and villains ahead of the release of the blockbuster film Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. But I’m a sucker for the DC’s ‘trinity’ – Batman, Wonder Woman and Superman – and I’m a long-time admirer of Dustin Nguyen’s art. So despite my hesitations, I pulled a copy from the shelf and dived in… and I was more than pleasantly surprised. I was delighted. This is a book that’ll have both adults and kids in stitches, scouring pages for inside jokes and references, and enraptured by the core mystery. In other words, it’s a winner.

Young Bruce Wayne, Clark Kent and Diana Prince form their own Junior Detective Agency in the halls of Ducard Academy in Gotham City when they realise there’s more to their new boarding school for ‘gifted’ children than meets the eye. They’re an oddball triumvirate, each displaying the divisive characteristics that’ve been portrayed in the comics for decades. Together, they unravel the mystery behind the school’s secret headmaster, overcoming the villainous obstacles in their way including fellow students Lex Luthor, Harley Quinn and the Joker, as well as dastardly school staff including General Zod, Hugo Strange, Vandal Savage, and so forth.

Secret Hero Society: Study Hall of Justice is layered with references that young fans and older will enjoy – but every element is explicated well enough to ensure the layman won’t be left lost and confused. This is fundamentally a story about friendship – how different personalities, regardless of upbringing, can be moulded into an effective team – with a good amount of super-heroics thrown in. It’s told through traditional comic book pages, journal entries, pamphlets, text messages, and report cards, and the variation enhances the tale’s readability. The only flaw I identified was the novel’s pacing. The story takes its time to get going – it’s not plodding, but necessarily measured in order to establish the characters and their world – but in contrast the climax feels rushed, like suddenly the storytellers realised they were running out of pages. It’s not a major issue, and it certainly doesn’t take away from the novel’s successes, but it’s a noticeable stumble.

This is the kind of book I wish had been around when I was a kid. It’s fun and quirky, but doesn’t talk down to readers. I’d love to see further adventures in this universe, and there’s certainly a ton more characters to explore from the DC Universe.

ISBN: 9781760276539
Format: Paperback
Pages: 176
Imprint: Scholastic Australia
Publisher: Scholastic Australia
Publish Date: 1-Feb-2016
Country of Publication: Australia

Review: Superman – The Men of Tomorrow by Geoff Johns & John Romita Jr.

Men of TomorrowJohn Romita Jr. is synonymous with Marvel Comics – his runs on Spider-Man, Iron Man andDaredevil are legendary (and for this reviewer especially, his stint on Peter Parker: Spider-Man, in the nineties, was seminal), so the 2014 announcement that he’d be coming to DC to work on Superman garnered waves of attention. That he’d be united for the first time with DC’s superstar writer (and Chief Creative Officer) Geoff Johns, was icing on the cake.

Up to this point, Superman’s adventures in the ‘New 52’ universe have been a mixed bag. There’s been some great stuff – Grant Morrison and Rag Morales’s initial issues in Action Comics, and latterly the work by Greg Pak (also in Action), and Scott Snyder’s Unchained – but there’ve been troughs, too. Years back, Geoff Johns and Gary Frank combined to create some of the best Superman comics of the past decade – in fact, possibly of all time – so the outlook following the Johns / Romita Jr. announcement looked positive; Superman fans were being rewarded for their patience with a kick-ass creative team. The Men of Tomorrow is the result.

The story revolves around Ulysses; a strange visitor from another dimension, who shares many of Superman’s experiences. Like the Man of Steel, in order to survive impending doom, he was rocketed into the unknown as a baby, to a place where he developed incredible abilities, and matured into adulthood with the belief his home planet had been destroyed; that he too, like Superman, was the last son of a dead world. When a being from Ulysses’s adopted home attacks Metropolis, Ulysses aids Superman in stopping the threat, and the two form a friendship.  Ulysses is stunned his home planet survived, and with Superman’s help, he seems destined to become another of Earth’s mighty protectors. As the story unfolds, Clark Kent is reunited with his old crew at the Daily Planet – Jimmy Olsen, Lois Lane, and Perry White – and begins to manifest a new superpower; one he can’t control, and with possibly devastating consequences. Bad timing; because Ulysses’s intentions mightn’t be as pure as they’d seemed…

John Romita Jr.’s art is exemplary, but won’t be to everyone’s tastes. He is a masterful storyteller, but perhaps not an artist you’d select for a pinup. There’s a workmanlike quality to his style that is admirable; his focus is on the story, and ensuring it’s laid out as functionally as possible. Thankfully, Johns gives him plenty of space to dynamically render the blockbuster scenes; our first sighting of Superman is spectacular, as he careens his fist into the giant-sized Titano.

Johns is on point here, too; though his depiction of Superman and his supporting cast is more reminiscent of the pre-New-52 world. Not a bad thing; it’s nice having Clark Kent back as newshound for the Daily Planet, and interfacing with his pals liked he used to. Still, in terms on continuity, The Men of Tomorrow doesn’t quite fit with recently scheduled programming; perhaps that’s why DC Comics chose not to number this volume.

The Men of Tomorrow isn’t quite vintage Superman, but it’s up there with the best of the character’s offerings from the New 52. It’s great seeing Romita Jr. stretch his wings and play with characters, and a world, he’s never touched before. For the art alone, this collection is worthy of a place on your shelf.

Review: Batman Volume 6 – Graveyard Shift

Batman Vol 6 Graveyard ShiftThe sixth volume of DC Comics’ Batman run features a collection of standalone issues and two-part storylines concocted by a variety of writers and artists. While previous volumes of Batman were seismic in their revelations and outstanding in their execution, Graveyard Shift isn’t as cohesive, and lacks the spark that made its predecessors essential purchases. Even so, it’s a fine prologue to Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo’s next blockbuster story-arc, Endgame, which is just now wrapping up in the comics.

Speaking of the acclaimed writer and artist pairing of Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo, they are the glue that holds Graveyard Shift together. Their Clay Face epic is brilliant, revitalising a long-dormant character, and their ‘zero’ issue, which turns back the clock and serves as a prologue to ‘Zero Year,’ is a lot of fun. Volume 6 of Batman turns the spotlight on less-vaunted writers (which is not to dismiss their sizable talent, because most creators pale in comparison to the megastar Snyder) such as James Tynion IV, Marguerite Bennett, Gerry Duggan, partnering them with incredible artists such as Any Kubert, Matteo Scalera, Alex Maleev and Dustin Nguyen present their take on the Caped Crusader. Batman’s grief over the loss of his son, Damian, binds several of these tales – the Dark Knight has never been great at deaths in the families – but long-time readers will feel this is well-treaded territory, and there’s not much here that revitalises the narrative.

Graveyard Shift also accelerates the world of Batman forward, showcasing a glimpse of the future in which Batman teams up with a new ally, Bluebird, as he takes on Gotham’s newest crime kingpin. It’s a solid story, introducing readers to a fresh status quo, but the collection’s shift from the past, to the present, and then to the future, means the volume lacks consistency. So the standalone story, The Meek, is therefore one of the most effective: really, it could take place at any time, and sees Batman solving a fairly standard (for him, anyway) serial killer case. Duggan and Scalera form a potent partnership to deliver a brilliantly dark story, and I hope to see them collaborate again.

So Graveyard Shift isn’t the standout collection in the ‘New 52’ Batman, but its solid smattering of crime stories makes it altogether worthwhile.

3 Stars Good

ISBN: 9781401252304
Format: Hardback (266mm x 176mm x 15mm)
Pages: 224
Imprint: DC Comics
Publisher: DC Comics
Publish Date: 12-May-2015
Country of Publication: United States

Review: Superman – Earth One Volume 3 by Straczynski and Syaf

Superman Earth OneThe third volume of J. Michael Straczynski’s re-imagining of Superman is flawed, inconsistent, and ultimately brings into question the purpose of DC Comics’s entire line of ‘Earth One’ original graphic novels in a post-New 52 world. Look closely and you’ll see, this is a story full of good intentions, but inept execution means it’s filled with more valleys than peaks.

Superman: Earth One – Volume 3 immediately loses appeal because it’s yet another retelling of the General Zod storyline we recently saw come to life on the big screen in Man of Steel. Regular readers, such as myself, have seen Zod’s origin retold on innumerable occasions over the years, as the elastic band of modern day continuity twisted and tweaked the character to suit a particular moment in Superman’s history. Straczynski’s take is particularly uninspired; almost a cardboard cut-out of what we’ve seen before. A shame, as with supposed free reign, surely the writer could’ve thought outside the box, just to differentiate his Zod from countless others. Artist Adrian Syaf’s redesign of the character is similarly uninspired; a hood shrouds Zod’s eyes in darkness, making him look especially untrustworthy, which makes the United Nation’s decision to back him over Superman even more laughable.

As Volume 3 opens, Superman remains an enigmatic figure, a super-powered threat that must be taken very seriously. Considered a saviour by some, a menace by others, young Clark Kent’s alter-ego is suffering from a case of the Spider-Man’s – – hey, it could be worse, at least he doesn’t have J. Jonah. Jameson giving him grief. The US Military have employed Mr. and Mrs. Luthor – that’s Alexandra and Lex, by the way – to develop the means to harm, or ideally destroy, the Man of Tomorrow. And they choose the moment Superman is battling Zod to test the device; targeting only Supes, naturally, not the other Kryptonian, because the UN have granted him a free pass (for nonsensical reasons).

Amidst all the fighting, Clark Kent’s relationship with his neighbour takes a romantic turn, and Superman’s gradually developing an affiliation with Lois Lane, too (who uses a Superman-symbolled Bat-signal, yes, really) to get his attention. Straczynski’s most comfortable during these quieter moments, nailing Clark’s general unease with himself and his struggles to lead a successful double-life, but these fleeting moments aren’t enough to salvage this convoluted mess. The Luthor’s are underdeveloped, and the culminating battle, which has fatal consequences, lacks any sort of resonance. The artistic highlights, which include some wonderfully dynamic iconic shots of Superman doing battle, or taking to the skies, are let down by occasionally clunky layouts and shot selections.

Superman: Earth One – Volume 3 is undercooked, almost rushed; from its overall plot, to its dialogue, to its art. Plot contrivances abound; the art fluctuates between very good and average; Straczynski’s characterisations of his cast vacillates uncannily. It’s all a bit of a mixed mag, and severely disappointing.