Review: James Patterson Bookshots – Cross Kill by James Patterson

9781786530011 (1)This bite-sized Alex Cross thriller sees the return of his long-thought-dead nemesis first introduced in Along Came a Spider, Gary Soneji.

Stories at the speed of life. All killer, no filler. The ultimate form of storytelling. These are just some of the taglines associated with James Patterson’s line of Bookshots titles. And while the latter instigates an irrepressible eyelid twitch, I’ll admit, there’s something to be said for the sheer pace of Cross Kill. As a lapsed Patterson reader, and a one-time big fan of his Alex Cross series, Cross Kill served as a nice reminder of what I enjoyed about his particular brand of storytelling all those years ago. It annihilated two hours of my evening like the snap of a finger, and so, I suppose I got what I paid for, and what was promised on the blurb.

It helps that Cross Kill flashes back to Patterson’s early Cross novels, when I was devouring them one-by-one from my father’s bookcase. Gary Soneji was Cross’s first epic villain – but he was seemingly killed more than a dozen novels ago, or more than ten years ago according to Patterson’s continuity. His return is impossible, but Cross is adamant it was Soneji who took a shot at him – and put a bullet in his partner’s head.

Unfolding at a wicked pace, there’s little meat on the bones of Cross Kill, but its events should have huge repercussions for the Alex Cross series moving forward; assuming everything’s not just swept under the rug for the next full-length novel. If you’re already a valiant Patterson reader, you’ll no doubt dig this, and it’ll sate your cravings until later in the year. If you’re not a fan, this won’t do much to persuade you to switch sides: it’s chock-full of his stylistic trappings, just thoroughly condensed, with all the nuance of a semi-trailer careening through a brick wall. But when you’ve been absorbed in gargantuan literary novels, as I have recently, this served as effective relief. And I’ll admit, I’m interested in picking up the next Cross novel to see how Patterson confronts this story’s dramatic moments.

ISBN: 9781786530011
Format: Paperback (188mm x 129mm x mm)
Pages: 144
Imprint: BookShots
Publisher: Cornerstone
Publish Date: 2-Jun-2016
Country of Publication: United Kingdom

Review: James Patterson Bookshots – Black & Blue by Candice Fox

Black and BlueIn high school I devoured James Patterson’s Alex Cross books, but a long time has passed since those days, and his style – short, choppy chapters with an extreme focus on plot rather than character – no longer resonates with me. It’s like he’s got the framework of a brilliant novel, but rather than fill it, he leaves his novel emancipated, stripped down, raw. It’s not for me – but obviously fits the bill for millions of other readers, so hey, I guess this is a case of accepting I’m the outlier. I grabbed a copy of Black & Blue purely for the Candice Fox factor. On the one hand, I want to support the work of a local author whom I greatly admire; on the other, I will admit, I just wanted to see how Patterson’s influence would impact her storytelling.

Black & Blue is one of the first entries in Patterson’s Bookshots series, dubbed as “the ultimate form of storytelling, and introduces Sydney detective Harriet Blue, who will star as the lead in a full-length novel this August, Never Never. The plot is simple – a young woman has washed up on a river bank, and Blue believes she’s another victim of Sydney’s worst serial killers in decades – the Georges River Killer. She investigates the murder alongside Tate Barnes, a despised, nomadic detective, whose methods are questionable, and whose past is black as pitch. Not that Blue is completely on the side of the angels, as demonstrated by her brutal takedown of an accused assailant under the cover of darkness early on in the novel.

There’s no question Black & Blue provides an hour of fast-paced entertainment – but there’s nothing here that’ll live long in readers’ memories. The plot is fairly rote, amped up by Patterson’s short chapters and constant perspective-shifts, from Blue, to the killer, to her superior officer. Speaking of, Harriett Blue and her supporting cast have potential, but it’s not properly explored here: it all feels very much like a tease, which I suppose is all I suppose it was meant to be. Still, as the ultimate form of storytelling, I was left feeling a tad indifferent. Black & Blue is a solid little thrill-ride, but if I had a say in the matter, I’d have voted for a solo Candice Fox novella instead. She is an author who has demonstrated a willingness to bend the tropes of the genre. Here she is playing very much by the rules, and the book lacks her trademark flair. That said, hopefully readers who enjoy Black & Blue will sample Hades, Eden and Fall.  It’ll blow their minds.

ISBN: 9781786530165
Format: Paperback (188mm x 129mm x mm)
Pages: 176
Imprint: BookShots
Publisher: Cornerstone
Publish Date: 2-Jun-2016
Country of Publication: United Kingdom