Review: Love by Roddy Doyle

9781787332287I’m a latecomer to Roddy Doyle, but was enraptured by Smile (2017) — a bleak novel about the legacy of institutional abuse in Ireland — and Charlie Savage (2019) — a collection of a year’s worth of hilarious, self-effacing and often poignant anecdotes, first published in the Irish Independent, about a middle-aged Dubliner reconciling with his own mortality. But Love is mysteriously expunged of the guffaw-inducing humour of the latter, or the shocking revelations of the former. And without either element, his latest is disappointingly bland, and by Doyle’s lofty standards, oddly prosaic.

Love shines the spotlight on two men in their late middle ages, who walk into a pub to drink and talk and reminisce. Several decades and hundreds of miles have separated Davy and Joe, but tonight they’re united, their conversation becoming increasingly drunken and sloppy, and pockmarked with revelations, the most significant (we think, until the novel’s latter stages) that Joe recently left his wife for Jessica, a woman he first met in one of the pubs he and Davy frequented in their youth.

Doyle’s the master of dialogue, and that’s showcased here, as he demonstrates the exacting nature of discourse between two emotionally stunted men, who are desperate to unveil their feelings, but burdened by the expectations of toxic masculinity. There are machinations on family and fatherhood, love and friendship, as they talk around their emotions; hide sentiment behind crude banter. Some of it is poignant, but much of it is exhausting. For a good hundred pages we are treading water, waiting for the novel to get to its point. I can’t help feeling this is a novel begging for a leaner page count.

ISBN: 9781787332287
Format: Paperback / softback
Pages: 336
Imprint: Jonathan Cape Ltd
Publisher: Vintage Publishing
Publish Date: 14-May-2020
Country of Publication: United Kingdom

Review: Trouble Is What I do by Walter Mosley

9781474616522When 92-year-old Mississippi blues musician Phillip “Catfish” Worry approaches Leonid McGill with the simple task of hand-delivering a letter to a wealthy heiress revealing her black heritage, the private eye accepts, unknowingly becoming the eye of a storm involving her flagrantly racist and vindictive father, and a notorious assassin with Catfish firmly in his sights.

The Leonid McGill series — Trouble Is What I Do being its sixth instalment — embraces the hardboiled private detective genre invented by Hamnett, refined by Chandler and Macdonald, and emulated by countless others; but few as successfully as Walter Mosley. The story is deceptively simple, its eclectic cast, crisp, lean and spare prose the perfect vehicle to highlight the systemic racism still prevalent in society.

It’s slick, quick, bread-and-butter stuff from Mosley, whose mastery of the genre is still evident even when he’s not at his peak. The biggest problem with his latest is that it reads like something he could write in his sleep. An entertaining addition to the McGill canon, best enjoyed by those already familiar with the ex-boxer and underground fixer turned PI.

ISBN: 9781474616522
Format: Hardback
Pages: 176
Imprint: Weidenfeld & Nicolson
Publisher: Orion Publishing Co
Publish Date: 27-Feb-2020
Country of Publication: United Kingdom

Review: The Adversary by Ronnie Scott

9780143796640This is one of those books where not a lot happens — but, prospectively, a lot happens, or is about to, depending on how the reader extrapolates its ending. It doesn’t manifest in action on the page, nor in a significant obtaining of wisdom that would pigeonhole it as a conventional “coming-of-age” tale. It is a novel whose magnitude is measured in precise, smaller moments, in which its author microscopically examines the evolution of a close friendship between two gay men as a scorching Melbourne summer ignites.

The Adversary eschews a traditional narrative structure, and casts the reader into the mind of its unnamed protagonist, exposes us to the vicissitudes and complexities of his life — noteworthy for its ordinariness, unembellished by genre-trappings — lays out the jump-start cable necessary to revive him from his almost-paralytic physical and emotional indolence, then shunts the reader out again. It reads like a bridging novel; we are witnessing an essential interval in a young man’s life, unbeknownst to him, and not pockmarked by elaborate embellishment or genre-surreality, that is leading towards something undefined. It is brilliantly true to life and relatable.

Writing with the assurance and authority that belies his status as first-time novelist, Ronnie Scott reveals the contradictions of the human heart and the complexities of friendship, love and sexuality. Compulsively readable, and memorable for its lack of clear-cut finality. The story – the narrator’s life – continues beyond the page.

ISBN: 9780143796640
Format: Paperback / softback
Pages: 256
Imprint: Hamish Hamilton
Publisher: Penguin Books Australia
Publish Date: 15-Apr-2020
Country of Publication: Australia

Review: Sisters by Daisy Johnson

9781787331778In Booker-shortlisted author Daisy Johnson’s unsettling second novel, two sisters — July and September — move across the country, with their mother, to a long-abandoned family home, where the deep bond they’ve always shared begins to contort into something noxious, something wicked, that reveals itself in its sharpest form when they meet a boy.

Sisters is a compelling and nuanced psychological drama you read feeling like there’s a fist in your stomach, squeezing your guts. There’s a great slathering of tension, that ratchets up adroitly, building to a climax that isn’t necessarily ferocious, but suitably haunting and disturbing. Johnson excavates maximum suspense from the most quotidian of human relationships, and the novel’s slight size does nothing to impede its richness; rather, it’s enhanced by its brevity, making it an all the more potent concoction.

Published: 2 July 2020
ISBN: 9781787331778
Imprint: Jonathan Cape
Format: Trade Paperback
Pages: 192
RRP: $29.99

 

Review: Into the Fire by Gregg Hurwitz

9780718185510On the eve of his retirement as “the Nowhere Man” — a harbinger of justice for those in need of desperate aid — former clandestine government assassin Evan Smoak — the infamous “Orphan X” — finds himself pitted against a seemingly endless supply of gun-totting goons as he attempts to liberate Max Merriweather from the looming threat of the bad guys who murdered his cousin.

Gregg Hurwitz writes with the pace and economy of a blockbuster action movie. Think Michael Bay’s The Rock or Bad Boys; not so much Transformers; thrillers with some semblance of heart and humanity. He understands the lurid pleasures readers want from their action-lit, and delivers in spades. In Into the Fire, Smoak is forced to infiltrate a police precinct; go undercover (and unarmed) into a maximum security prison; and face off against a barrage of gunmen nursing a concussion, armed with only a sniper rifle. All par for the course for Hurwitz’s hero, who readers know will walk out of every confrontation (relatively) unscathed; the pleasure comes from witnessing how he escapes these impossible odds.

The fifth book in the series, Into the Fire leans heavily into its established continuity. In some respects, this feels like a bridging novel between the next momentous phase in the life of Orphan X. Plot threads related to his Max Merriweather mission are suitably tied; but there’s plenty left dangling to suggest the next novel could be truly cataclysmic for Evan. New readers will still enjoy the bombastic action and bodycount, but longtime fans will truly appreciate the repercussions it potentially has for the series moving forward.

In the hotly-contested field of action-lit, Gregg Hurwitz comes out on top, time and time again.

Published: 11 February 2020
ISBN: 9780718185510
Imprint: Michael Joseph
Format: Trade Paperback
Pages: 480
RRP: $32.99

Review: Rodham by Curtis Sittenfeld

9780857526137Curtis Sittenfeld’s new novel is more than a dazzling and seductive alternate history about a world in which Hillary Rodham decided not to marry Bill Clinton to maintain her independence. It’s a searing commentary on the unjust compromises and aspersions faced by female politicians compared to their male counterparts, and how much harder it is for women to make their way in politics, or any facet of public life; any walk of life, in fact.

Hillary is merely the vehicle Sittenfeld uses to showcase this inequality; but saturating her fiction in the texture of Hillary’s reality, with one major twist, adds a brilliant vitality to the work, and a layer of verisimilitude that using a totally fabricated character would not have allowed. This narrative decision is utterly seductive, and Sittenfeld clearly had great fun contemplating the seismic ramifications that one different decision might’ve produced. Where is Donald Trump in this new world? Barrack Obama? Indeed, what actually happened to Bill Clinton; did he achieve his political ambitions without Hillary as his first lady? Sittenfeld answers all of these questions, and more. I was addicted to learning more, and incredibly impressed by her ability to humanise Hillary, and turn her into a sympathetic character rather than a caricature. I’ve no doubt it’ll be one of my favourite books of the year.

ISBN: 9780857526137
Format: Paperback
Number Of Pages: 400
Available: 19th May 2020
Publisher: Transworld Publishers Ltd

Review: Burn by Patrick Ness

burnOn a cold Sunday evening in 1957, Sarah Dewhurst and her father wait in the parking lot of the Chevron Gas Station for the dragon Gareth hired to help on the farm. Their encounter with Kazimir — a rare, enigmatic blue dragon — ignites a world-ending chain of events they have no hope of aborting; for this is their destiny. This is fate.

Blending the epic with the intimate, Patrick Ness has crafted a novel of exquisite escapism. He weaves new religions, histories and conflicts into an action-packed, character-focused romp, teeming with rogue FBI agents, a cruel xenophobic deputy sheriff, dragons (of course) and a teenage assassin; and that’s only the start of its stunningly diverse cast.

Burn has the propulsion of a thriller — its two grand action scenes are masterpieces of excitement and stomach-clenching tension — and the earnestness of the very best tales of young romance. Ness is a brilliantly nimble writer, able to flick between blockbuster moments and personal with peerless grace. It’s the stuff of literary magic.

ISBN: 9781406375503
Number Of Pages: 384
Available: 7th May 2020
Publisher: Walker Books Ltd