Review: Trouble Is What I do by Walter Mosley

9781474616522When 92-year-old Mississippi blues musician Phillip “Catfish” Worry approaches Leonid McGill with the simple task of hand-delivering a letter to a wealthy heiress revealing her black heritage, the private eye accepts, unknowingly becoming the eye of a storm involving her flagrantly racist and vindictive father, and a notorious assassin with Catfish firmly in his sights.

The Leonid McGill series — Trouble Is What I Do being its sixth instalment — embraces the hardboiled private detective genre invented by Hamnett, refined by Chandler and Macdonald, and emulated by countless others; but few as successfully as Walter Mosley. The story is deceptively simple, its eclectic cast, crisp, lean and spare prose the perfect vehicle to highlight the systemic racism still prevalent in society.

It’s slick, quick, bread-and-butter stuff from Mosley, whose mastery of the genre is still evident even when he’s not at his peak. The biggest problem with his latest is that it reads like something he could write in his sleep. An entertaining addition to the McGill canon, best enjoyed by those already familiar with the ex-boxer and underground fixer turned PI.

ISBN: 9781474616522
Format: Hardback
Pages: 176
Imprint: Weidenfeld & Nicolson
Publisher: Orion Publishing Co
Publish Date: 27-Feb-2020
Country of Publication: United Kingdom