Review: The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin

ImmortalistsNew York, 1969. The Gold children – Varya, thirteen; Daniel, eleven; Klara, nine; and Simon, seven – visit a psychic in a grimy tenement building on the Lower East Side. Rumour has it she can predict the future; actually proclaim the date you will die. Which is both a terrifying and alluring prospect for the siblings; ultimately one too tempting to ignore. So they divvy up their allowance and make the trip. Find their way to the psychic’s door. Knock. One by one, the Gold children enter the psychic’s den. One by one, they learn their fate. And then live with this knowledge, festering in the back of their minds, a countdown to their own personal doomsday.

Chloe Benjamin’s The Immortalists asks readers to consider how they would live with a clock ticking inside their head, counting down to a hypothetical irreversible endpoint. Would you live life to the fullest? Intentionally partake in hazardous activities, placated by the assurance your time hasn’t yet come? Or would you live a sheltered life? Protect yourself, cocoon yourself, saddled with this unwanted burden. Perhaps you’d reject the prophecy entirely; just live your life the way you want to, balanced between carefree and considered, as most of us do. The Gold children are fine projections of possible responses to such a scenario, with very different mindsets and responses to their fates.

Simon is at one end of the spectrum; who uses a hypothesised early demise as an excuse to flee his childhood home and the confines of the family business to live in San Francisco with his sister Klara, where he becomes a dancer at a gay club, and indulges numerous sexual partners. His fate is telegraphed – predictable, even – but still serves as the novel’s opening emotional gut-punch, the reverberations of which are felt through to the novel’s end. Klara, considered the outsider of the quartet, studies magic on the West Coast and eventually takes her act to Las Vegas alongside her husband and stage partner, with whom she shares a child. Meanwhile, Daniel becomes a doctor in the military, struggling with the nobility of signing soldiers medically fit, only to send them to war; and the inhibited Varya is a scientist, doing longevity experiments with primates.

The Immortalists is split into four sections, each focusing on a different sibling, but various secondary characters weave through these episodes, some in a more contrived fashion than others, in an attempt to accentuate the drama. Despite a couple of instances of events tying together a little too coincidentally, Benjamin’s novel is never anything short of compelling, and these minor flaws are completely overrun by the richness of its characters. The subtleties of their differing stances as they wrestle with the magnitude of knowing the date of their death is exceptional. Ultimately, while the ‘ticking clock’ element of the tale adds narrative impetus, readers’ emotional investment is garnered from their hope that the Gold’s fractured relationships can be healed before it’s too late.

The Immortalists is the kind of brilliant novel that swallows you whole, forces you to live in its world even when you’re not turning its pages. A meditation on predestination and guilt, this family saga might’ve landed in bookstores in January, but it’s one readers will be thinking about until the end of the year. I expect to see it on several ‘best of’ lists.

ISBN: 9781472244994
Format: Paperback (234mm x 153mm x mm)
Pages: 416
Imprint: Tinder Press
Publisher: Headline Publishing Group
Publish Date: 9-Jan-2018
Country of Publication: United Kingdom

 

One thought on “Review: The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s